FETA and Center for Visual Communication present:

 

FM FEME. Frost Electronic Music Ensemble

A concert featuring Frost Electronic Music Ensemble, Greg Evans and Alec Druth in live solo and group performances. The program also includes radio dramas composed by the Frost students for the occasion.

 

Miami, You Made it Weird. Diana Wade, viola with Jennifer Beattie, voice

Horse videos, Thomas Edison, french fries, loud breathing, and maybe a little viola playing. Violist Diana Wade presents a program of works by Beglarian, Norman, Saariaho, Sciarrino, Schankler, and Wade

 

March 3, 2018

7-9:30PM

Center for Visual Communication

541 NW 27th St, Miami, FL 33127

 

 

 

About the Artists:

Frost Electronic Music Ensemble (FEME).

Based at University of Miami’s Frost School of Music, FEME creates and performs experimental music written for computers, instruments and sounding objects. FEME artistically explores both established and home-made developed technologies. The ensemble has participated in stationary and mobile events in Miami since 2014.   Juraj Kojs, director.

 

Diana Wade, viola

Violist Diana Wade likes to make strange sounds, usually on the viola. In her performance of Berio’s Sequenza VI, Diana was praised for playing with “both athletic and operatic ferocity” and “throwing herself into tremolo passages with a physical force that shook her and a sonic one that practically shook the walls” (Mark Swed, LA Times). If none of this is ringing a bell, then you may recognize her for saying “Shia LaBeouf” in that internet video.

Diana enjoys a richly varied musical life that she is cultivating in Los Angeles. Not only can she be heard recording for film and television, but also performing with ensembles such as the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Los Angeles Master Chorale, wild Up and appearances in series such as Jacaranda, Tuesdays @ Monk Space, and the Hear Now Music Festival.

Recently, Diana has found herself turning to composition. Her bizarre vocal fry extravaganza “Fry on Fry” has been tickling audiences all along the West Coast. Current projects include a new work for the duo So Much Hot Air and an arrangement of Garth Knox’s Jonah and the Whale for Diana and mezzo-soprano Jennifer Beattie. This season, Diana has been invited to attend the retreat Artists at Albatross Reach as a violist and composer where she will be collaborating with fellow artists on the development of weird, fun new work.

Formerly a founding member of the Argus Quartet, Diana has collaborated with Anthony Dean Griffey, David Shifrin, and the Brentano Quartet and worked with composers such as Christopher Theofanidis, Martin Bresnick, Andrew Norman, and Thomas Kotcheff in the performance of their music.

Diana holds degrees and certificates from Temple University, Cleveland Institute of Music and University of Southern California and she studied with CJ Chang, Jeffrey Irvine, and Donald McInnes. Diana plays on a viola made by Tetsuo Matsuda in 2004 that she’s lovingly named Fernando. In the rare moment that she’s not playing viola, Diana enjoys writing lists, running, and wishing she were an opera singer.

 

 

Jennifer Beattie, voice

Mezzo-soprano Jennifer Beattie, called a “smashing success” (San Francisco Examiner) and praised for her “warmth” (New York Times) and “exuberant voice and personality” (Opera News), revels in performing everything from traditional to brand-new classical repertoire, as well as engaging in ongoing collaborations with performance, visual, jazz, folk, and theater artists.  Her projects this season include creating the role of Anna in the world premiere of Lembit Beecher’s opera Sophia’s Forest (http://lembitbeecher.com/treeofsound/), written for chamber orchestra (including the award-winning Aizuri Quartet) and electronically-controlled sound sculptures; championing art song written by women & performing with drag queen Cookie DiOrio on her series “The Art of the Heel” (http://fringearts.com/2017/08/17/art-heel-interview-cookie-diorio/); and developing the The Black Queen project (http://queen.black/), an historical discovery/storytelling epic featuring electronic, classical and Slovakian-folk music with composer Juraj Kojs, pianist Adam Marks, and collaborators from four countries, which premieres in Miami in the Fall of 2018.

Jennifer has been a featured soloist with organizations including The National Opera Orchestra at the Kennedy Center; The Philadelphia Orchestra; Opera Philadelphia; the Columbus Symphony Orchestra; Symphony in C; Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia; the Mozarteum in Salzburg, the Brooklyn Art Song Society; the Dame Myra Hess Series in Chicago; Malibu’s Stotsenberg Recital Series w/ John Musto at the piano; the National Arts Club NYC; Argento Chamber Ensemble at the Park Avenue Armory; JACK Quartet; Aizuri Quartet; Argus Quartet; and the Lake George Music Festival.

As an important voice in new American music, Jennifer has collaborated with and premiered works by such composers as Tom Cipulloand as vocalist-in-residence for several seasons at the New Music on the Point Festival. Jennifer is a member of chamber music duos Albatross, with pianist Adam Marks (artists-in-residence with the Yale college composers); and So Much Hot Air, with oboe/ English horn player Zachary Pulse. She also serves as co-director of Artists at Albatross Reach, a retreat for the development of weird, wonderful new work and artistic collaborations in northern California.

Frost Science Museum Miami Spectacular Views

Photographs by Barry Fellman

This private web page is for use by Frost Science Museum Staff only.
These images may not be used or reproduced without permission.

Artist’s Notes on the images in HURRICANE

Hurricane Andrew hit Miami Dade County on August 24, 1992 as a category 5 hurricane.
These images document the effect the most powerful hurricane to hit Florida in almost a century had on the Kendall Tamiami Airport.

When Andrew hit I lived in South Kendall off 137th Avenue, just north of the decimated residential community Country Walk, in the extended area that was severely affected by the storm.  I am a Miami native and this was by far the worst hurricane I had been through.

We were fortunate that our family suffered no physical harm.  We had comparatively minor damage to our house but were without electricity for weeks. The day after the Hurricane we made temporary repairs to our home and tended to our neighbors’ needs, which luckily were also minor.

By the second day it sunk in that recovery from the storm would be a lengthy and cumbersome process.  We began to assess damage to other parts of our neighborhood.  Although many roads were blocked and power lines strewn all over I was able to drive for a few blocks in the direction of the airport and walk onto the airfield.  I was astounded by the way the planes had been tossed about and broken apart as if they were toys.  The buildings had been turned into masses of twisted metal.  The incongruity of such fastidiously kept places as airplane hangars and aviation maintenance shops being in total disarray was hard to comprehend.  When I returned home we were beginning to see the first images of the incredible damage to residential structures just to our south on a battery operated tv.

I decided over the next days to go back to the airport with my camera and large format transparency film from our warm refrigerator. The bright colors and cool white surfaces of the planes glinting in the sun became the outer skins of strange new objects.  The scene was so foreign to me, with everything broken and out of place, that I was compelled to find a new point of view.  After a few visits I had the notion I was viewing a movie and thought I should try to suspend my disbelief like I would in a theater.  I tried to re-frame my perspective and thought in terms of organizing complexity.
These pictures attempt to unscramble the maze of intertwined metal by finding the new designs imposed by nature.  They show my effort to make sense of the disarray and find some beauty in the chaos.

Now with the courage to look back at these images after having put them away for over two decades I recognize they are the result of being challenged to see in a new way.  I hope they say that by seeking a different perspective to see the world we walk through, we can find new ways to appreciate the things and places that surround us.

HURRICANE
A New Book by Barry Fellman Commemorating the 25th Anniversary of Hurricane Andrew

Twenty Five years ago the most damaging hurricane to hit the US in nearly a century slammed into Miami-Dade County.  HURRICANE shows the drama and devastation wreaked by the Category 5 storm through spectacular bold images, most of which have never been seen before.  Barry Fellman’s powerful color images pack a punch that hits you in the gut with the intensity of once in a lifetime event.

HURRICANE features essays by then WTVJ-NBC weatherman and hero Bryan Norcross, the man who “talked South Florida through great hurricane of 1992”, and New York Times photography critic Vicki Goldberg.

The books are currently available for purchase at Books&Books in Coral Gables, as well as EXILE Books. Both a limited edition Artist book with an embossed metal cover and a soft cover edition are available. Both editions feature painstakingly produced color corrected images made that give the impact of the photographer’s original large format color transparencies.

To get the limited edition Artist’s Book, click here.

To get the limited edition Soft Cover Book, click here.

Hurricane Andrew Photographs by Barry Fellman

This is a private web page.
These images may not be used or reproduced without permission.
Credit: Photo by Barry Fellman Courtesy Center for Visual Communication, Miami

Frost Science Opening Day Photographs by Barry Fellman

This private web page is for use by Frost Science Museum Staff only.
These images may not be used or reproduced without permission.
Credit: Photo by Barry Fellman Courtesy Center for Visual Communication, Miami

Frost Science Grand Opening Day Photographs by Barry Fellman

This private web page is for use by Frost Science Museum Staff only.
These images may not be used or reproduced without permission.
Credit: Photo by Barry Fellman Courtesy Center for Visual Communication, Miami

Frost Science Construction Photographs by Barry Fellman

This private web page is for use by Frost Science Museum Staff only.
These images may not be used or reproduced without permission.

Folio 1      Folio 2      Folio 3      Folio 4      Folio 5      Folio 6      Folio 7      Folio 8      Folio 9      Folio 10      Folio 11      Folio 12      Folio 13      Folio 14      Folio 15      Folio 16      Folio 17      Folio 18      Folio 19      Folio 20      Folio 21      Folio 22      Folio 23      Folio 24

Frost Science Museum Construction Progress Photographs     Credit: Photo by Barry Fellman Courtesy Center for Visual Communication, Miami

Frost Science Construction Photographs by Barry Fellman

This private web page is for use by Frost Science Museum Staff only.
These images may not be used or reproduced without permission.

Folio 1      Folio 2      Folio 3      Folio 4      Folio 5      Folio 6      Folio 7      Folio 8      Folio 9      Folio 10      Folio 11      Folio 12      Folio 13      Folio 14      Folio 15      Folio 16      Folio 17      Folio 18      Folio 19      Folio 20      Folio 21      Folio 22      Folio 23      Folio 24

Frost Science Museum Construction Progress Photographs     Credit: Photo by Barry Fellman Courtesy Center for Visual Communication, Miami

Frost Science Museum Miami Spectacular Views

Photographs by Barry Fellman

This private web page is for use by Frost Science Museum Staff only.
These images may not be used or reproduced without permission.
Frost Science Museum Construction Progress Photographs     Credit: Photo by Barry Fellman Courtesy Center for Visual Communication, Miami